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14 Instruction[a] from the wise is like[b] a life-giving fountain,[c]
to turn[d] a person[e] from deadly snares.[f]

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Footnotes

  1. Proverbs 13:14 tn The term תוֹרָה (torah) in legal literature means “law,” but in wisdom literature often means “instruction; teaching” (BDB 435 s.v.); cf. NAV, NIV, NRSV “teaching”; NLT “advice.”
  2. Proverbs 13:14 tn The comparative “like” does not appear in the Hebrew text, but is implied by the metaphor.
  3. Proverbs 13:14 tn Heb “fountain of life” (so KJV, NAB, NIV, NRSV). The genitive חַיִּים (khayyim) functions as a genitive of material, similar to the expression “fountain of water.” The metaphor means that the teaching of the wise is life-giving. The second colon is the consequence of the first, explaining this metaphor.
  4. Proverbs 13:14 tn The infinitive construct with preposition ל (lamed) gives the result (or, purpose) of the first statement. It could also be taken epexegetically, “by turning.”
  5. Proverbs 13:14 tn The term “person” does not appear in the Hebrew text, but is supplied in the translation for the sake of clarity and smoothness.
  6. Proverbs 13:14 tn Heb “snares of death” (so KJV, NAB, NASB, NIV, NRSV, NLT). The genitive מָוֶת (mavet) functions as an attributive adjective. The term “snares” makes an implied comparison with hunting; death is like a hunter. W. McKane compares the idea to the Ugaritic god Mot, the god of death, carrying people off to the realm of the departed (Proverbs [OTL], 455). The expression could also mean that the snares lead to death.

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