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I. The Prologue[a]

Chapter 1

Since many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the events that have been fulfilled among us,(A) just as those who were eyewitnesses from the beginning and ministers of the word have handed them down to us,(B) I too have decided, after investigating everything accurately anew, to write it down in an orderly sequence for you, most excellent Theophilus,

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Footnotes

  1. 1:1–4 The Gospel according to Luke is the only one of the synoptic gospels to begin with a literary prologue. Making use of a formal, literary construction and vocabulary, the author writes the prologue in imitation of Hellenistic Greek writers and, in so doing, relates his story about Jesus to contemporaneous Greek and Roman literature. Luke is not only interested in the words and deeds of Jesus, but also in the larger context of the birth, ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus as the fulfillment of the promises of God in the Old Testament. As a second- or third-generation Christian, Luke acknowledges his debt to earlier eyewitnesses and ministers of the word, but claims that his contribution to this developing tradition is a complete and accurate account, told in an orderly manner, and intended to provide Theophilus (“friend of God,” literally) and other readers with certainty about earlier teachings they have received.

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