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30 So they tried to arrest him, but no one laid a hand upon him, because his hour had not yet come.(A)

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20 He spoke these words while teaching in the treasury in the temple area. But no one arrested him, because his hour had not yet come.(A)

Jesus, the Father’s Ambassador.[a]

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Footnotes

  1. 8:21–30 He whose ambassador I am is with me. Jesus’ origin is from God; he can reveal God.

23 [a]Jesus answered them,(A) “The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified.

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Footnotes

  1. 12:23 Jesus’ response suggests that only after the crucifixion could the gospel encompass both Jew and Gentile.

III. The Book of Glory[a]

Chapter 13

The Washing of the Disciples’ Feet.[b] Before the feast of Passover,[c] Jesus knew that his hour had come to pass from this world to the Father. He loved his own in the world and he loved them to the end.(A)

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Footnotes

  1. 13:1–19:42 The Book of Glory. There is a major break here; the word “sign” is used again only in Jn 20:30. In this phase of Jesus’ return to the Father, the discourses (Jn 13–17) precede the traditional narrative of the passion (Jn 18–20) to interpret them for the Christian reader. This is the only extended example of esoteric teaching of disciples in John.
  2. 13:1–20 Washing of the disciples’ feet. This episode occurs in John at the place of the narration of the institution of the Eucharist in the synoptics. It may be a dramatization of Lk 22:27—“I am your servant.” It is presented as a “model” (“pattern”) of the crucifixion. It symbolizes cleansing from sin by sacrificial death.
  3. 13:1 Before the feast of Passover: this would be Thursday evening, before the day of preparation; in the synoptics, the Last Supper is a Passover meal taking place, in John’s chronology, on Friday evening. To the end: or, “completely.”

12 Then he sent messengers to the king of the Ammonites to say, “What do you have against me that you come to fight with me in my land?”

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18 So she said to Elijah, “Why have you done this to me, man of God? Have you come to me to call attention to my guilt and to kill my son?”

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13 Elisha asked the king of Israel, “What do you want with me? Go to the prophets of your father and to the prophets of your mother.” The king of Israel replied, “No, the Lord has called these three kings together only to deliver us into the power of Moab.”

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21 Neco sent messengers to him, saying: “What quarrel is between us, king of Judah? I have not come against you this day, for my war is with another kingdom, and God has told me to hasten. Do not interfere with God who is with me; let him not destroy you.”

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Ephraim! What more have I to do with idols?(A)
    I have humbled him, but I will take note of him.
I am like a verdant cypress tree.[a]
    From me fruit will be found for you!

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Footnotes

  1. 14:9 Verdant cypress tree: the symbol of lasting life, the opposite of the sacred trees of the Baal cult (4:13). The Lord provides the “fruit” (peri) to Israel (2:7, 10), another instance of the wordplay on Ephraim (see notes on 9:16 and 13:15).

24 [a]he cried out, “What have you to do with us,[b] Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God!”

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Footnotes

  1. 1:24–25 The Holy One of God: not a confession but an attempt to ward off Jesus’ power, reflecting the notion that use of the precise name of an opposing spirit would guarantee mastery over him. Jesus silenced the cry of the unclean spirit and drove him out of the man.
  2. 1:24 What have you to do with us?: see note on Jn 2:4.

crying out in a loud voice, “What have you to do with me,[a] Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me!”

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Footnotes

  1. 5:7 What have you to do with me?: cf. Mk 1:24 and see note on Jn 2:4.

30 When the woman went home, she found the child lying in bed and the demon gone.

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20 “When I broke the seven loaves for the four thousand, how many full baskets of fragments did you pick up?” They answered [him], “Seven.”

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23 At the resurrection [when they arise] whose wife will she be? For all seven had been married to her.”

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Chapter 13

The Destruction of the Temple Foretold.[a] As he was making his way out of the temple area one of his disciples said to him, “Look, teacher, what stones and what buildings!”(A)

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Footnotes

  1. 13:1–2 The reconstructed temple with its precincts, begun under Herod the Great ca. 20 B.C., was completed only some seven years before it was destroyed by fire in A.D. 70 at the hands of the Romans; cf. Jer 26:18; Mt 24:1–2. For the dating of the reconstruction of the temple, see further the note on Jn 2:20.

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